Cambridge Scientists Mend Broken Hearts

embryonic stem cell

embryonic stem cell

Heart attacks are devastating, even for those who survive. During myocardial infarction, your heart is temporarily deprived of oxygen and the resulting tissue damage is impossible to reverse. A weak heart affects quality of life, not to mention your chances of surviving the next cardiac event.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge, a Priorclave partner, are working on a solution for these damaged cardiac tissues—but that solution has even wider applications than mending broken hearts.

Bioengineering for Broken Hearts

Biologist Dr. Sanjay Sinha and his team, including biochemist Professor Richard Farndale and materials scientists Professors Ruth Cameron and Serena Best, are using stem cell technology to grow beating heart tissue patches that can be used to repair damaged hearts back to full strength. The possibilities for future therapies is tremendous. “The technology we’ve developed for culturing cells is exciting because it is adaptable to a huge range of applications—almost any situation where you’re trying to regenerate new tissue,” explains Best.

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